Aerobic Exercise Training Linked to Enhanced Brain Function in Adults at Risk for Alzheimer’s Disease

Regular aerobic exercise may decrease the likelihood of developing Alzheimer's disease, or slow its progression, in adults who are at higher risk, say scientists in a special issue of Brain Plasticity

February 3, 2020 - Amsterdam, NL – Individuals at risk for Alzheimer's disease (AD) because of family history or genetic predisposition who engaged in six months of aerobic exercise training improved their brain glucose metabolism and higher-order thinking abilities (e.g., planning and mental flexibility) called executive function; these improvements occurred in conjunction with increased cardiorespiratory fitness. The results of this study are published in a special issue of Brain Plasticity devoted to Exercise and Cognition. More...

February 3, 2020

Mild Cognitive Impairment: ISS Produces the First Epidemiological Estimation of the Phenomenon Among Migrants in Europe

January 30, 2020 - Rome, Italy – In a study published in the Journal of Alzheimer's Disease, researchers from Italy’s Istituto Superiore di Sanità (ISS) (National Institute of Health) estimated about 680,000 cases of mild cognitive impairment (MCI), in a total of 12,730,960 migrants, aged between 60 and 89 years, living in the European Union (EU) in 2018. More...

January 30, 2020

High and Low Exercise Intensity Found to Influence Brain Function Differently

Study suggests that exercise could play a role as a therapeutic strategy in neurological and psychiatric disorders

January 30, 2020 - Amsterdam, NL – A new study shows for the first time that low and high exercise intensities differentially influence brain function. Using resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging (Rs-fMRI), a noninvasive technique that allows for studies on brain connectivity, researchers discovered that low-intensity exercise triggers brain networks involved in cognition control and attention processing, while high-intensity exercise primarily activates networks involved in affective/emotion processing. The results appear in a special issue of Brain Plasticity devoted to Exercise and Cognition. More...

January 30, 2020

Light at the End of the Tunnel for Most Individuals With Low-Vision

Vision loss after damage to the retina, optic nerve or brain is in part reversible, reports a special issue of Restorative Neurology and Neuroscience

January 22, 2020 - Amsterdam, NL – Progress in research and technology is giving rise to an optimistic future for compensation and restoration of low vision, according to research in a special issue of Restorative Neurology and Neuroscience, published by IOS Press. Seven studies explore different aspects of vision loss after damage to the retina, optic nerve or brain due to diseases such as glaucoma or optic neuropathy. Remarkable progress is being made to treat conditions of partial blindness that have previously been considered irreversible. More...

January 22, 2020