Journal of Future Robot Life

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ISSN print
2589-9953
ISSN online
2589-9961
Volume
1; 2 issues
Status
Soon open for submissions to Volume 1
Next issue
Next issue (1:1) scheduled for January 2020
Back volumes
1
Subject
Artificial Intelligence, Computer Science, Robotics

New Journal, Welcoming Submissions Soon – Our brand new publication Journal of Future Robot Life will be open for submissions later in 2019. Check back again for more details!

News & Sign Ups – If you are interested to receive news about this journal, let us know at: iospress.com/newsletters

Open Access Fee Waiver – Journal of Future Robot Life is an open access journal and we are pleased to announce that the open access fees are waived for papers submitted in 2019 and 2020.

What will robots be like ten, twenty and more years from now? What will they be able to accomplish? How will human–robot relationships have advanced? What place in society will be occupied by robots? These are just some of the questions which will be debated in the pages of this new publication – the Journal of Future Robot Life.

Computer science and artificial intelligence (AI) have had a huge impact on society, an impact that will only increase with further advances in hardware and software technologies. Robots are the most remarkable product of these developments in computing and AI, many of them being designed in a humanlike form and endowed with humanlike capabilities: talking, hearing, seeing, moving and performing complex tasks such as dancing, conducting an orchestra, rescuing victims at disaster sites, playing musical instruments, and beating a world champion at chess.

As robots become more humanlike in their appearance and their capabilities, and as they come to be regarded more and more as our companions and assistants in all aspects of daily life, different questions beg to be answered. We need to contemplate what life will be like when robots can imitate human behavior sufficiently to be regarded, in some sense, as our equals. And when we humans have adapted our ways of life in order to interact fully with robots as alternative people, and to benefit fully from our relationships with them, such questions on the future of human–robot interactions and human–robot relationships are the raison d’etre of this journal. What civil rights and legal rights should robots be granted? What are the ethics of humankind’s interactions with robots? Will robots have empathy? Will their personalities and emotions mimic our own? Will robots be programmed with social intelligence, or can they acquire it through a learning process? Will robots be alive in any humanlike sense, and if so, how?

The Journal of Future Robot Life will attempt to answer these questions and many more. The topics which we group under the umbrella phrase “future robot life” are many and varied, and the list will doubtless expand with time. We shall start with the following:

Animal–robot interfaces
Are robots alive?
Biological behaviors
Companion robots
Evolutionary robots
Human–robot reproduction
Human–robot interfaces
Implanted cyborg technologies
Laws relating to robots
Nanorobots in medicine
Plant–robot interfaces
Robot emotions
Robot ethics
Robot personalities
Robot reproduction
Robot rights
Robot–human parents
Robots as doctors
Robots as economists
Robots as lovers
Robots as politicians
Robots as psychiatrists/therapists
Robots as spouses
Robots as teachers
Robots in Entertainment
Robots in government
Robots on the battlefield
Social intelligence in robots
Swarm robot behavior.

Editors-in-Chief

Professor Adrian David Cheok
Imagineering Institute, Johor, Malaysia
City University London, UK
E-mail: adrian@imagineeringinstitute.org

Dr. David Levy
London NW3 2LD, UK
E-mail: davidlevylondon@gmail.com

Editorial Board
To be announced

Submission of Manuscripts

By submitting my article to this journal, I agree to the IOS Press License to Publish: https://www.iospress.nl/service/authors/author-copyright-agreement/ and the IOS Press Privacy Policy: https://www.iospress.nl/privacy-policy/.

This journal will be open for submissions in May 2019.

Journal of Future Robot Life is an Open Access journal. Published papers are currently not subjected to an Open Access fee. They will be published freely available for download through content.iospress.com at no charge to the authors.

Required files
For initial submission a .pdf file of the article is sufficient. After an article has been accepted for publication an editable file of the text, such as MsWord or LateX, is required. If you are uploading a paper that has been accepted for publication or accepted pending minor revisions please upload the source files of the paper. If using LaTeX please use the standard article.sty as a style file and also send a pdf version of the LaTeX file as well as separate files of all figures (if any); see "Preparation of manuscripts" for the required file formats. LaTeX packages should be compiled into .zip or .rar files.

Colour figures
In the online version all figures in an article will appear in colour. It is possible to have figures printed in colour also in the paper version of the journal, provided the cost of their reproduction is paid for by the author. If your article is accepted for publication you will be provided with information regarding this option in the galley proofing stage. See "Preparation of Manuscripts" for the required file formats.

IOS Pre-press
Journal of Future Robot Life publishes all articles online with 'pre-press' (meaning they are published online shortly after acceptance, before being published in an eventual issue of the journal). The pre-press articles are the uncorrected galley proof versions of the article and are published online shortly after the proof is created. Pre-press articles are fully citable using the article DOI number. As soon as the pre-press article is assigned to an issue, final author corrections will be incorporated and final bibliographic information will be added. The pre-press version will then be replaced by the updated, final version.

Organization of the paper and style of presentation
Manuscripts must be written in English. Authors whose native language is not English are advised to seek the advice of a native English speaker, before submitting their manuscripts. Through Peerwith you can get an offer from a language and copyediting expert to ensure your paper has the appropriate level of English. You may expect to receive free and non-binding quotes from experts in your field of research within 24 hours after submitting a request.

Manuscripts should be prepared with wide margins and double spacing throughout, including the abstract, footnotes and references. Every page of the manuscript, including the title page, references, tables, etc., should be numbered. However, in the text no reference should be made to page numbers; if necessary, one may refer to sections. Try to avoid the excessive use of italics and bold face.

Manuscripts should be organized in the following order:

  • Title page
  • Body of text (divided by subheadings)
  • Acknowledgements
  • References
  • Tables
  • Figure captions
  • Figures Headings and subheadings should be numbered and typed on a separate line, without indentation. SI units should be used, i.e., the units based on the metre, kilogramme, second, etc.

Title page
The title page should provide the following information:

  • Title (should be clear, descriptive and not too long)
  • Name(s) of author(s); please indicate who is the corresponding author
  • Full affiliation(s)
  • Present address of author(s), if different from affiliation
  • Complete address of corresponding author, including tel. no., fax no. and e-mail address
  • Abstract; should be clear, descriptive, self-explanatory and not longer than 200 words, it should also be suitable for publication in abstracting services
  • Keywords.

Tables
Number as Table 1, Table 2, etc., and refer to all of them in the text. All tables should be contained within the manuscript itself, and embedded in the text. Each table should have a brief and self-explanatory title. Column headings should be brief, but sufficiently explanatory. Standard abbreviations of units of measurement should be added between parentheses. Vertical lines should not be used to separate columns. Leave some extra space between the columns instead. Any explanations essential to the understanding of the table should be given in footnotes at the bottom of the table.

Figures
Number figures as Fig. 1, Fig. 2, etc., and refer to all of them in the text. All figures and other graphics should be contained within the manuscript itself, and embedded in the text. Colour figures can be included, provided the cost of their reproduction is paid for by the author. For the file formats of the figures please take the following into account: - line art should be have a minimum resolution of 600 dpi, save as EPS or TIFF - grayscales (incl photos) should have a minimum resolution of 300 dpi (no lettering), or 500 dpi (when there is lettering); save as tiff - do not save figures as JPEG, this format may lose information in the process - do not use figures taken from the Internet, the resolution will be too low for printing - do not use colour in your figures if they are to be printed in black & white, as this will reduce the print quality (note that in software often the default is colour, you should change the settings) - for figures that should be printed in colour, please send a CMYK encoded EPS or TIFF Figures should be designed with the format of the page of the journal in mind. They should be of such a size as to allow a reduction of 50%. On maps and other figures where a scale is needed, use bar scales rather than numerical ones, i.e., do not use scales of the type 1:10,000. This avoids problems if the figures need to be reduced. Each figure should have a self-explanatory caption. The captions to all figures should be typed on a separate sheet of the manuscript. Photographs are only acceptable if they have good contrast and intensity.

References
Authors are requested to use the Vancouver citation style. Place citations as numbers in square brackets in the text. All publications cited in the text should be presented in a list of references at the end of the manuscript. List the references in the order in which they appear in the text. Only articles published or accepted for publication should be listed in the reference list. Submitted articles can be listed as (author(s), unpublished data). If an article has a DOI, this should be provided after the page number details. The number is added after the letters 'doi'. Manuscripts will not be considered if they do not conform to the Vancouver citation guidelines.

References must be listed in Vancouver style:
[1] Rose ME, Huerbin MB, Melick J, Marion DW, Palmer AM, Schiding JK, et al. Regulation of interstitial excitatory amino acid concentrations after cortical contusion injury. Brain Res. 2002; 935(12): 406.
[2] Murray PR, Rosenthal KS, Kobayashi GS, Pfaller MA. Medical microbiology. 4th ed. St. Louis: Mosby; 2002.
[3] Berkow R, Fletcher AJ, editors. The Merck manual of diagnosis and therapy. 16th ed. Rahway (NJ): Merck Research Laboratories; 1992.
[4] Meltzer PS, Kallioniemi A, Trent JM. Chromosome alterations in human solid tumors. In: Vogelstein B, Kinzler KW, editors. The genetic basis of human cancer. New York: McGrawHill; 2002. p. 93113.
[5] Canadian Cancer Society [homepage on the Internet]. Toronto: The Society; 2006 [updated 2006 May 12; cited 2006 Oct 17]. Available from: www.cancer.ca/.

Copyright of your article
Authors submitting a manuscript do so on the understanding that they have read and agreed to the terms of the IOS Press Author Copyright Agreement.

Quoting from other publications
An author, when quoting from someone else's work or when considering reproducing figures or table from a book or journal article, should make sure that he is not infringing a copyright. Although in general an author may quote from other published works, he should obtain permission from the holder of the copyright if he wishes to make substantial extracts or to reproduce tables, plates or other figures. If the copyright holder is not the author of the quoted or reproduced material, it is recommended that the permission of the author should also be sought. Material in unpublished letters and manuscripts is also protected and must not be published unless permission has been obtained. Submission of a paper will be interpreted as a statement that the author has obtained all the necessary permission. A suitable acknowledgement of any borrowed material must always be made.

Proofs
The corresponding author will receive a PDF proof and is asked to check this proof carefully (the publisher will execute a cursory check only). Corrections other than printer's errors, however, should be avoided. Costs arising from such corrections will be charged to the authors.