Security Sector Transformation in Southeastern Europe and the Middle East

Share
Editor
Dokos, T.
Pub. date
September 2007
Pages
204
Binding
hardcover
Volume
24 of NATO Science for Peace and Security Series - E: Human and Societal Dynamics
ISBN print
978-1-58603-757-4
ISBN online
978-1-60750-254-8
Subject
Life & Behavioural Sciences, Social Sciences
€115 / US$150 Excl. VAT
Order Security Sector Transformation in Southeastern Europe and the Middle East ISBN @ €115.00
Order Ebook

For most countries, security today is primarily measured in non-military terms and threats to security are non-military in nature. These threats include incompetent government, corruption, organized crime, insecure borders, smuggling (weapons, drugs, contraband, people), illegal migration, ethnic and religious conflict, proliferation of weapons of mass destruction, shortage of natural resources (e.g., water) and, of course, terrorism. As security is no longer just a military concern, it is no longer just the preserve of MODs and MFAs which have, to date, been the main ministries involved in security cooperation. It is no longer possible to draw a clear distinction between external security and internal security. Security henceforth requires the coordination of the ‘external’ ministries (i.e., MOD and MFA) and their agencies (armed forces, intelligence services) with those of the ‘interior’ ministries: internal affairs, education, finance, overseas development, transport, environment; health, etc., with their agencies (policing forces, security services, disaster relief agencies, etc.). Security today takes in social development and demands the involvement of all elements of society in a way which security in the Cold War days did not. Meeting these new security requirements demands fundamental reform of national structures, patterns of investment, and systems of government. Likewise it demands the evolution of international institutions on a truly radical scale.