Human Language Technologies – The Baltic Perspective

Proceedings of the Ninth International Conference Baltic HLT 2020

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Editors
Utka, A., Vaičenonienė, J. , Kovalevskaitė, J., Kalinauskaitė, D.
Pub. date
September 2020
Pages
280
Binding
softcover
Volume
328 of Frontiers in Artificial Intelligence and Applications
ISBN print
978-1-64368-116-0
ISBN online
978-1-64368-117-7
Subject
Artificial Intelligence, Computer & Communication Sciences
 
This book contains a subject index
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Human language technology is the study of the methods by which computer programs or electronic devices can analyze, produce, modify or respond to human texts and speech. It consists of natural language processing and computational linguistics on the one hand, and speech technology on the other.


This book presents the proceedings of the 9th International Conference, Human Language Technologies – The Baltic Perspective (Baltic HLT 2020), organised in Kaunas, Lithuania on 22 and 23 September 2020. This biennial conference offers researchers a platform to share knowledge on recent advances in human language processing for the Baltic languages, as well as promoting interdisciplinary and international cooperation in human language-technology research within and beyond the Baltic States. In addition to the traditional topics of natural language processing and language technologies, this year’s conference featured a special session on resource and tool development for teaching and learning the less resourced Baltic languages. This year, 42 submissions were received, each of which was evaluated by two reviewers, resulting in a total of 34 papers being accepted for presentation and publication. The book is divided into four sections: speech and text analysis (9 papers); machine translation and natural understanding (6 papers); tools and resources (14 papers); and language learning resources (5 papers).


Providing a fascinating overview of current research in the field from a primarily Baltic perspective, the book will be of interest to all those whose work involves human language technology.