Biomedicine in the Twentieth Century: Practices, Policies, and Politics

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Editor
Hannaway, C.
Pub. date
March 2008
Pages
388
Binding
hardcover
Volume
72 of Biomedical and Health Research
ISBN print
978-1-58603-832-8
ISBN online
978-1-60750-308-8
Subject
Medicine & Health
€130 / US$182 Excl. VAT
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‘Each of the essays offers a useful, often pertinent, and always interesting contribution to the historiography of twentieth-century biomedicine and invites more to follow.’- Robert G.W. Kirk, Wellcome Unit for the History of Medicine, University of Manchester
Biomedicine in the Twentieth Century: Practices, Policies, and Politics is a testimony to the growing interest of scholars in the development of the biomedical sciences in the twentieth century and to the number of historians, social scientists and health policy analysts now working on the subject. The book is comprised of essays by noted historians and social scientists that offer insights on a range of subjects that should be a significant stimulus for further historical investigation. It details the NIH’s practices, policies and politics on a variety of fronts, including the development of the intramural program, the National Institute of Mental Health and mental health policy, the politics and funding of heart transplantation and the initial focus of the National Cancer Institute. Comparisons can be made with the development of other American and British institutions involved in medical research, such as the Rockefeller Institute and the Medical Research Council. Discussions of the larger scientific and social context of United States’ federal support for research, the role of lay institutions in federal funding of virus research, the consequences of technology transfer and patenting, the effects of vaccine and drug development and the environment of research discoveries all offer new insights and suggest questions for further exploration.