Service

 

Our (e)Books and (e)Journals

IOS Press serves the information needs of scientific and medical communities worldwide. See what's new and browse our books and journals to learn more.

Service

 

Tissue Engineering Applications Combining Biomaterial Scaffolds with Stem Cells Will Facilitate Delivery of Targeted Therapies

April 24, 2019 - Amsterdam, NL – StemJournal, a new open access, peer-reviewed journal published by IOS Press, announces publication of its inaugural article, “Combining Stem Cells and Biomaterial Scaffolds for Constructing Tissues and Cell Delivery” by Stephanie M. Willerth, PhD, and Shelly E. Sakiyama-Elbert, PhD. This timely overview of the available biomaterials for directing stem cell differentiation as a means of producing replacements for diseased or damaged tissues is a comprehensive update of the classic review published in StemBook in 2008.

April 24, 2019

When Designing Clinical Trials for Huntington’s Disease, First Ask the Experts: The Patients

April 23, 2019 - Amsterdam, NL – Progress in understanding the genetic mutation responsible for Huntington's disease (HD) and at least some molecular underpinnings of the disease has resulted in a new era of clinical testing of potential treatments. How best to design clinical trials in which HD patients are willing to participate and comply is a question faced by researchers. For that reason, investigators in the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania (Penn) surveyed HD patients at different stages of the disease about their attitudes and treatment goals. The results, published in the Journal of Huntington's Disease, should be useful for designing future clinical trials of gene therapies for HD and other genetic disorders.

April 23, 2019

IOS Press Unveils New Book: Ontology Makes Sense, An Homage to Nicola Guarino

April 8, 2019 - IOS Press announces the publication of Ontology Makes Sense, a book in honor of Nicola Guarino.

April 8, 2019

Abnormalities in a Protein Affecting How Nerve Cells Change Shape May Be Linked to Huntington’s Disease

April 3, 2019 - Amsterdam, NL – Since 1993, when the gene that causes Huntington's disease (HD) was identified, there has been intense focus on understanding how this genetic mutation causes the disease's severe progressive neural deterioration. In a new study published in the Journal of Huntington's Disease, investigators have discovered that the HD mutation may alter the interactions of Huntingtin, the large protein produced by the HD gene, with Rac1, a protein that directs changes in cell shape. In HD, this interaction may result in abnormalities in the pathway controlling neural cell shape and dendritic growth, which can affect how well nerve cells communicate with one another.

April 3, 2019