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Link Between Alzheimer’s Disease and Gut Microbiota is Confirmed

November 25, 2020 - Brescia, Italy – Alzheimer's disease is the most common cause of dementia. Still incurable, it directly affects nearly one million people in Europe, and indirectly millions of family members as well as society as a whole. In recent years, the scientific community has suspected that the gut microbiota plays a role in the development of the disease. A team from the University of Geneva (UNIGE) and the University Hospitals of Geneva (HUG) in Switzerland, together with Italian colleagues from the National Research and Care Center for Alzheimer's and Psychiatric Diseases Fatebenefratelli in Brescia, University of Naples and the IRCCS SDN Research Center in Naples, confirm the correlation, in humans, between an imbalance in the gut microbiota and the development of amyloid plaques in the brain, which are at the origin of the neurodegenerative disorders characteristic of Alzheimer's disease.

November 25, 2020

Neurorehabilitation Experts Highlight Breakthroughs in Neurogenic Pain Management

November 18, 2020 - Amsterdam, NL – There have been significant advances in knowledge regarding the pathology, etiology, assessment, and treatment of several significant neurogenic pain disorders regularly encountered by neurorehabilitation professionals in both inpatient and outpatient care. In a collection of articles published in NeuroRehabilitation, experts describe the latest advancements in neurogenic classification and pain management and treatment of these disorders.

November 18, 2020

New Study Finds a Link Between Sleep Apnea and Increased Risk of Dementia

November 11, 2020 - Melbourne, Australia – A new study by Monash University has found that obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) has been linked to an increased risk of dementia. The study, published in the Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease, and led by Dr. Melinda Jackson from the Turner Institute for Brain and Mental Health, found that severe OSA is linked to an increase in a protein, called beta-amyloid, that builds up on the walls of the arteries in the brain and increases the risk of dementia.

November 11, 2020

Psychological Status Rather Than Cognitive Status is Associated with Incorrect Perception of Risk of Falling in Patients with Moderate Stage Dementia

November 10, 2020 - Heidelberg, Germany – Dementia is associated with an impaired self-perception with potentially harmful consequences for health status and clinical risk classification in this patient group with an extraordinary high risk of falling. A new study published in the Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease indicates that psychological factors such as anxiety or fear of falling, cognitive sub-performances such as executive functions, as well as behavioral strategies such as support seeking and interplay with other risk factors should be considered when risk of falling is documented in patients with dementia (PWD).

November 10, 2020