Human Brain Deficits of PKCe: Targeted for Alzheimer’s Disease Therapeutic and Diagnostic Trials

August 20, 2014 - Today, researchers at the Blanchette Rockefeller Neurosciences Institute (BRNI) announced findings from a new study entitled, “PKCe Deficits in Alzheimer’s Disease Brains and Skin Fibroblasts.” These new findings offer significant promise for a new therapeutic and diagnostic approach to Alzheimer's disease (AD) that has remained so refractory to effective and early drug treatment. This approach is now the major focus of ongoing clinical trials being conducted by at BRNI/Neurotrope, Inc. collaboration. In contrast to past strategies, this new therapeutic strategy now being clinically tested, not only removes the precursors to amyloid plaques and tangles, it also induces the growth of new synapses and prevents neuronal death. More...

Drexel University College of Medicine Research May Lead to Improved Alzheimer’s/ Vascular Dementia Diagnostic Guidelines

August 14, 2014 - Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and vascular dementia (VaD) are the most common forms of dementia. Traditionally, these illnesses have been treated as separate clinical syndromes. But new research led by Drexel University College of Medicine suggests that AD and VaD have much more in common than diagnostic guidelines currently allow. The study is set for publication in the September edition of the Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease. More...

Decline in Daily Functioning Related to Decreased Brain Activity in Early Stages of Alzheimer’s Disease

August 12, 2014 - Decline in daily functioning associated with Alzheimer’s disease is related to alterations in activity in certain regions of the brain, according to a study published in the August 2014 issue of the Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease. More...

Dementia Risk Quadrupled in People with Mild Cognitive Impairment

According to large-scale population-based study published in the Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease

August 7, 2014 - In a long-term, large-scale population-based study of individuals aged 55 years or older in the general population researchers found that those diagnosed with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) had a four-fold increased risk of developing dementia or Alzheimer’s disease (AD) compared to cognitively healthy individuals. Several risk factors including older age, positive APOE-ɛ4 status, low total cholesterol levels, and stroke, as well as specific MRI findings were associated with an increased risk of developing MCI. The results are published in a supplement to the Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease. More...