No Evidence of AD-Associated Changes in Adolescents Carrying Genetic Risk Factors

According to Two New Studies Published in the Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease

April 9, 2014 - Two studies published in the Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease indicate that some of the pathologic changes associated with Alzheimer’s disease in older individuals are not apparent in young people who carry the apolipoprotein (APOE) genetic risk factor for developing the disease. In the first study, no differences were found in hippocampal volume or asymmetry between cognitively normal adolescent carriers and non-carriers of the ApoE ɛ4 or ɛ2 allelles. The second study reports no differences in plasma concentrations of amyloid-β peptides among young adult ɛ4, ɛ3 or ɛ2 carriers. More...

New Therapeutic Target Discovered for Alzheimer’s Disease

Drug candidate blocks production of disease-causing neurotoxins in mouse models

March 19, 2014 - A team of scientists from the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine, the Medical University of South Carolina and San Diego-based American Life Science Pharmaceuticals, Inc., report that cathepsin B gene knockout or its reduction by an enzyme inhibitor blocks creation of key neurotoxic pGlu-Aβ peptides linked to Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Moreover, the candidate inhibitor drug has been shown to be safe in humans. More...

SDSC/UC San Diego Researchers Hone in on Alzheimer’s Disease

‘Gordon’ Supercomputer Helps Guide New Drug Designs

February 21, 2014 - Researchers studying peptides using the Gordon supercomputer at the San Diego Supercomputer Center (SDSC) at the University of California, San Diego (UCSD) have found new ways to elucidate the creation of the toxic oligomers associated with Alzheimer’s disease. More...

Neuropsychological assessment more efficient than MRI for tracking disease progression in memory clinic patients

According to new study published in the Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease

February 19, 2014 - Investigators at the University of Amsterdam, The Netherlands, have shown that progression of disease in memory clinic patients can be tracked efficiently with 45 minutes of neuropsychological testing. MRI measures of brain atrophy were shown to be less reliable to pick up changes in the same patients. More...