Biomedical Spectroscopy and Imaging

Biomedical Spectroscopy and Imaging

ISSN print
2212-8794
ISSN online
2212-8808
Volume
3; 4 issues
Status
Last issue (3:3) online on 07 July 2014
Next issue
3:4 scheduled for October 2014
Back volumes
1-2
Subject
Biochemistry, Medicine & Health
Institutional subscription for 2014 €410 / US$530 Excluding VAT
Subscription Rates Free Sample Copy
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Advances in Biomedical Spectroscopy is a book series that complements the journal Biomedical Spectroscopy and Imaging (BSI). This book series is devoted to in-depth discussion of specific spectroscopic and imaging techniques. Latest advances in the application and development of these methods in health, life and biomedical sciences are covered. The books are intended to serve the needs of experienced scientists and early stage researchers in both academia and industry. 
Please visit Advances in Biomedical Spectroscopy for more information.

Biomedical Spectroscopy and Imaging (BSI) is a multidisciplinary journal devoted to the timely publication of basic and applied research that uses spectroscopic and imaging techniques in different areas of life science including biology,  biochemistry, biotechnology, bionanotechnology,  environmental science, food science, pharmaceutical science, physiology and medicine.   Scientists are encouraged to submit their work for publication in the form of original articles, brief communications, rapid communications, reviews and mini-reviews.

The journal is dedicated to providing a single forum for experts in spectroscopy and imaging as applied to biomedical problems, and also for life scientists who use these powerful methods for advancing their research work.  BSI aims to promote communication, understanding and synergy across the diverse disciplines that rely on spectroscopy and imaging. It also encourages the submission of articles describing development of new devices and technologies, based on spectroscopy and imaging methods, for application in diverse areas including medicine, biomedical science, biomaterials science, environmental science, pharmaceutical science, proteomics, genomics, metabolomics, microbiology, biotechnology, genetic engineering, nanotechnology, etc.

Techniques covered include, but are not limited, to the following:

• Vibrational Spectroscopy (Infrared, Raman, Teraherz)
• Circular Dichroism Spectroscopy
• Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (NMR, ESR)
• UV-vis Spectroscopy
• Mössbauer Spectroscopy
• X-ray Spectroscopy (Absorption, Emission, Photoelectron, Fluorescence)
• Neutron Spectroscopy
• Mass Spectroscopy
• Fluorescence Spectroscopy
• X-ray and Neutron Scattering
• Differential Scanning Calorimetry
• Atomic Force Microscopy
• Surface Plasmon Resonance
• Magnetic Resonance Imaging
• X-ray Imaging
• Electron  Imaging
• Neutron Imaging
• Raman Imaging
• Infrared Imaging
• Terahertz  Imaging
• Fluorescence Imaging
• Near-infrared spectroscopy

Editor-in-Chief

Dr. Parvez I. Haris
Faculty of Health & Life Sciences
De Montfort University
UK
bsi@iospress.com

Editor for Asia

Z. Yu
Tsinghua University
Beijing
China

Editorial Board

A. Alimonti (Italian National Institute for Health, Rome, Italy)
Y. Asakawa (Tokushima Bunri University, Tokushima, Japan)
M. Baranska (Jagiellonian University, Krakow, Poland)
J. S. Becker (Research Center Juelich, Juelich, Germany)
D. Cicero (University of Rome “Tor Nergata”, Rome, Italy)
J.G. Contreras (Universidad Autónoma de San Luis Potosi, San Luis Potosí, Mexico)
L. Davenport (Brooklyn College of CUNY, New York, NY, USA)
M. Davies (The Heart Research Institute, Sydney, Australia)
P. Dolashka (Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Sofia, Bulgaria)
P. Dorozhkin (NT-MDT Co., Moscow, Russia)
E. Drakaki (National Technical University of Athens, Athens, Greece)
M. Ferrari (University of L'Aquila, L'Aquila, Italy)
F. Galindo (Universitat Jaume I de Castellón, Castellón de la Plana, Spain)
A. Gandjbakhche (National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, USA)
N. Gierlinger (University of Natural Resources and Applied Sciences, Vienna, Austria)
K. Glunde (Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA)
J.C. Gomez-Fernandez (Universidad de Murcia, Murcia, Spain)
I. Gorshkova (National Institute of Health, Bethesda, MD, USA)
D. Graham (University of Strathclyde, Glasgow, UK)
A. Haka (Cornell University, Ithaca, NY, USA)
H. Hebert (Karolinska Institutet, Huddinge, Sweden)
E.M.C. Hillman (Columbia University, New York, NY, USA)
H-Y. Holman (Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA, USA)
Z. Huang (National University of Singapore, Singapore)
N. R. Jagannathan (All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi, India)
R.A. Kauppinen (University of Bristol, Bristol, UK)
E. Kennedy (University College, Dublin, Ireland)
J. P. Klare (University of Osnabrück, Osnabrück, Germany)
K. Kneipp, (Technical University of Denmark, Lyngby, Denmark)
W. Knoll (Austrian Institute of Technology, Vienna, Austria)
H. Kobayashi (National Cancer Institute Bethesda, MD, USA)
C. Kraft (Friedrich-Schiller-Universitä t Jena, Jena, Germany)
J. Li (National Research Council, Ottawa, Canada)
S-Y. Lin (Yuanpei University, Hsinchu, Taiwan)
H. P. Lu (Bowling Green State University, OH, USA)
A. Macnab (University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada)
J. M. McDonnell (Kings College London, London, UK)
L.M. Miller (Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY, USA)
K. Momot (Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, Australia)
C. Muntean (National Institute for Research and Development of Isotopic and Molecular Technologies, Cluj-Napoca, Romania)
D. Naumann (Robert Koch Institute, Berlin, Germany)
T. Noguchi (Nagoya University, Nagoya, Japan)
S.J. Perkins (University College London, London, UK)
R.J. Poppi (University of Campinas, Campinas, Brazil)
F. Severcan (Middle East Technical University, Ankara, Turkey)
Z. Shao (Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai, China)
H. Shinzawa (Nagoya University, Nagoya, Japan)
P.S. Shrivastav (Gujarat University, Gujarat, India)
S. Sifakis (University Hospital of Heraklion, Crete, Greece)
L. Smith (University of Oxford, Oxford, UK)
G. Stephanopoulo (MIT, Cambridge, MA, USA)
T. Sutherland (Central Melbourne Medical Imaging, Melbourne, Australia)
F.Tanfani (Università Politecnica delle Marche, Ancona, Italy)
K. Tominaga (Kobe University, Kobe, Japan)
H. Vogel  (University Of Calgary, Calgary, Canada)
E.X. Wu (University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, China)
G. Yoon (Seoul National University of Science and Technology, Seoul, South Korea)
P. Yu (University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Canada)
H. Zeng (University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada)
J. Zhang (University of California, Santa Cruz, USA)
G. Zhu (The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Hong Kong, China) 

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See also our website for more information about this option IOS Press Open Library®

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International Science Editing offers a language and copyediting service to all scientists who want to publish their manuscript in scientific peer-reviewed periodicals and books.

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Manuscripts should be organized in the following order:

  • Title page
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The abstract for research papers should follow the “structured abstract” format. Section labels should be in bold uppercase letters followed by a colon, and each section will begin on a new line.
BACKGROUND:
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REFERENCES

Place citations as numbers in square brackets in the text. All publications cited in the text should be presented in an alphabetical list of references at the end of the manuscript in the following style:

[1] B. Newman and E.T. Liu, Perspective on BRCA1, Breast Disease 10 (1998), 3-10.
[2] D.F. Pilkey, Happy conservation laws, in: Neural Stresses, J. Frost, ed., Controlled Press, Georgia, 1995, pp. 332-391.
[3] E. Wilson, Active vibration analysis of thin-walled beams, Ph.D. Dissertation, University of Virginia, 1991.

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How to order reprints, a PDF file, journals, or IOS Press books
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Chemical Abstracts Service (CAS)
PubsHub

New Technology Reveals Insights into Mechanisms Underlying Amyloid Diseases

11 Jul 2014 - Amyloid diseases, such as Alzheimer’s disease, type 2 diabetes, cataracts, and the spongiform encephalopathies, all share the common trait that proteins aggregate into long fibers which then form plaques. Yet in vitro studies have found that neither the amylin monomer precursors nor the plaques themselves are very toxic. New evidence using two-dimensional infrared (2D IR) spectroscopy has revealed an intermediate structure during the amylin aggregation pathway that may explain toxicity, opening a window for possible interventions, according to a report in the current issue of Biomedical Spectroscopy and Imaging....

Elevated Levels of Copper in Amyloid Plaques Associated with Neurodegeneration in Mouse Models of Alzheimer’s Disease

23 Aug 2013 - Metals such as iron, copper, and zinc are important for many biological processes. In recent years, studies have shown that these nutritionally-essential metals are elevated in human Alzheimer’s disease (AD) brains and some animal models of AD. Scientists are now exploring whether these metals are causing the neurodegeneration seen in AD or are indicative of other ongoing pathologic processes....

Breakthrough Study Opens Door to Broader Biomedical Applications for Raman Spectroscopy

21 Feb 2013 - Raman spectroscopy has enabled incredible advances in numerous scientific fields and is a powerful tool for tissue classification and disease recognition, although there have been considerable challenges to using the method in a clinical setting. Scientists have now demonstrated the advantages of wavelength-modulated Raman spectroscopy, opening the door to wider biomedical and clinical applications such as real-time assessment of tissues during surgery. This study is published in Biomedical Spectroscopy and Imaging....

Low-Arsenic Rice Discovered in Bangladesh Could Have Major Health Benefits

18 Feb 2013 - Millions of people worldwide are regularly exposed to arsenic through drinking water and eating rice grown in soil and water containing high amounts of arsenic. Long-term exposure can lead to the development of different types of cancer as well as serious cardiovascular, neurological, and other health problems. Scientists have now identified aromatic rice from Bangladesh that has far lower arsenic concentrations than found in non-aromatic rice. The other important benefit is that it contains higher amounts of selenium and zinc. The discovery is reported in Biomedical Spectroscopy and Imaging....

IOS Press Launches New Journal: Biomedical Spectroscopy and Imaging

13 Jul 2012 -

IOS Press is pleased to announce the launch of Biomedical Spectroscopy and Imaging, the first journal to integrate the broad areas of spectroscopy and imaging.  It will provide timely publication of basic and applied research that uses spectroscopic and imaging techniques across all areas of life sciences.

“The timing is perfect for the integration of these two methodologies so that both spatial and molecular details of complex biological systems can be determined at high resolution.  The two approaches complement each other in many ways and so it is not surprising to see a rapid growth in studies where both methods are simultaneously applied,” said Editor-in-Chief Parvez Haris, CChem, FRSC, FRSPH. 

Dr. Haris comes to Biomedical Spectroscopy and Imaging after a successful tenure as Editor-in-Chief of Spectroscopy: An International Journal. He is head of the Biomedical and Environmental Health Group at De Montfort University, Leicester, UK, and his research studies involve the use of a wide array of spectroscopic methods for analysis of biological systems with particular focus on human health.  He is a Fellow of the Royal Society of Chemistry and also a Fellow of the Royal Society for the Promotion of Public Health.  Dr. Haris is joined by an editorial board with expertise in diverse areas of spectroscopy and imaging from around the world. 

Biomedical Spectroscopy and Imaging will provide a single forum for experts in spectroscopy and imaging as applied to biomedical problems, and also for life scientists who use these powerful methods for advancing their research work.  It will also feature articles describing the development of new devices and technologies, based on spectroscopy and imaging methods, for application in diverse areas including medicine, biomedical science, biomaterials science, environmental science, pharmaceutical science, proteomics, genomics, metabolomics, microbiology, biotechnology, genetic engineering, and nanotechnology.

Dr. Einar Fredriksson, Director, IOS Press, commented, “These are exciting times in the development of spectroscopic and imaging tools.  IOS Press is proud to provide a forum to advance our understanding of how these powerful methods can shed light on complex biological systems.”   

The inaugural issue of Biomedical Spectroscopy and Imaging will publish on Friday, July 13.  Carrying on the close to 30-year tradition of Spectroscopy: An International Journal, the journal welcomes submissions focusing on biomedical applications from authors in the form of original articles, brief communications, rapid communications, reviews and minireviews. Access to the first issue is freely available at http://bit.ly/LeBYYg.

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NOTES FOR EDITORS
Full text of the inaugural issue is freely available at http://bit.ly/LeBYYg. Contact Kairi Look, IOS Press, +31 20 688 3355, k.look@iospress.nl for additional information or to schedule interviews with Dr. Haris.

INAUGURAL ISSUE TABLE OF CONTENTS
Why a new journal called Biomedical Spectroscopy and Imaging?, Parvez I. Haris

GDPD5 Inhibition Alters the Choline Phospholipid Metabolite Profile of Breast Cancer Cells Toward a Less Malignant Metabolic Profile, Mailin Döpkens, Tiffany R. Greenwood, Farhad Vesuna, Venu Raman, Dieter Leibfritz, Kristine Glunde

Spectroscopic Study of Chemical Compositions of Cardiac Calculus Using Portable Raman Analyzer with a Fiber-optic Probe, Ching-Li Cheng, Hsiao-Huang Chang, Shan-Yang Lin 

Microstructural Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Articular Cartilage, Konstantin I. Momot

Diagnosis and Screening of Cancer Tissues by fiber-optic probe Raman spectroscopy, C. Krafft, S. Dochow, I. Latka, B. Dietzek, J. Popp

Bio-imaging of Metals in a Mouse Model of Alzheimer’s Disease by Laser Ablation Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry, Andreas Matusch and J. Sabine Becker

FTIR Spectroscopic Imaging of Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Beta Thalassemia Major Disease State, Ceren Aksoy, Duygu Uckan, Feride Severcan

Protein Secondary Structure and Solvent Accessibility of Proteins in Decellularized Heart Valve Scaffolds,

Shangping Wang, Harriëtte Oldenhof, Andres Hilfiker, Michael Harder, Willem F. Wolkers

In vivo Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy of Cancer, Virendra Kumar, Uma Sharma and N. R. Jagannathan

ABOUT IOS PRESS
Commencing its publishing activities in 1987, IOS Press (www.iospress.com) serves the information needs of scientific and medical communities worldwide. IOS Press now (co-)publishes over 100 international journals and about 130 book titles each year on subjects ranging from computer sciences and mathematics to medicine and the natural sciences.

IOS Press continues its rapid growth, embracing new technologies for the timely dissemination of information. All journals are available electronically and an e-book platform was launched in 2005.

Headquartered in Amsterdam with satellite offices in the USA, Germany, India and China, IOS Press has established several strategic co-publishing initiatives. Notable acquisitions included Delft University Press in 2005 and Millpress Science Publishers in 2008.

Contact:
Kairi Look
IOS Press
Tel: +31 20 688 3355
Fax: +31 20 687 0019|
E-mail: k.look@iospress.nl

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