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Well-known Author and Historian Reports on Progress in Huntington’s Therapies

Path towards a Treatment for the Disease Explored in Inaugural Issue of Journal of Huntington’s Disease

June 26, 2012
Our understanding of the causes and mechanisms of Huntington’s disease (HD) has grown at a dramatic pace since the discovery of the genetic marker for the disease in 1983. While therapies to treat the disease lag behind these laboratory discoveries, disease altering interventions are moving closer to the clinic. In the inaugural issue of the Journal of Huntington’s Disease Alice Wexler, PhD, an authority on the history of Huntington’s disease, author, and research scholar with the UCLA Center for the Study of Women, recounts important milestones along the journey towards a treatment or cure for the disease.

“When the abnormal gene that causes HD was identified in 1993, many of us in HD families imagined that a cure – or at least an effective treatment – was close at hand,” says Dr. Wexler. “That dream has not yet been realized. But if the history of HD can provide clues for the future, it suggests that change doesn’t always happen gradually. It can also happen swiftly. And that, I believe, is a great source for hope.”

Although clinical accounts of HD date back to the mid-19th century, as late as the 1960s few doctors knew anything about it. Those who did could offer no effective treatments and families with the illness tried hard to keep it hidden. “All of a sudden, in the 1960s, this began to change,” says Dr. Wexler.  Grassroots advocacy by HD families, and the efforts of a small international network of neurologists who formed international collaborations to study the disease, began to have an impact.

The genetic marker for HD was discovered in 1983, and HD research intensified. It reached a dramatic turning point in 1993, when the discovery of the genetic abnormality that causes HD made possible an array of new models and experimental approaches. Since then, scientists have created a variety of new animal and cell models, identified potential genetic modifiers, and illuminated many aspects of neuronal dysfunction. They are also testing methods of gene silencing and other novel therapeutic strategies in a variety of animal models.

“For families struggling daily with HD, effective intervention can’t come soon enough,” says Dr. Wexler. “But the volume of research has increased tremendously in the past decade. Disease altering interventions are moving closer to the clinic. The launch of the Journal of Huntington’s Disease provides a welcome new resource in our campaign to heal a formidable disease.”  

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NOTES FOR EDITORS

“Huntington’s Disease: A Brief Historical Perspective,” Alice Wexler. Journal of Huntington’s Disease, Volume 1/Issue1 (2012), DOI 10.3233/JHD-2012-129002. Published by IOS Press.

Full text of the article is available to credentialed journalists. Contact Daphne Watrin, IOS Press, +31 20 688 3355, d.watrin@iospress.nl. Journalists wishing to interview the author should contact Alice Wexler, PhD, at arwexler@ucla.edu.

The articles and the full inaugural issue of Journal of Huntington’s Disease are freely available at http://iospress.metapress.com/content/122585/.

ABOUT THE JOURNAL OF HUNTINGTON’S DISEASE (JHD)

Launched in June 2012, the Journal of Huntington’s Disease is an international multidisciplinary journal to facilitate progress in understanding the genetics, molecular correlates, pathogenesis, pharmacology, diagnosis and treatment of Huntington’s disease and related disorders. The journal is dedicated to providing an open forum for original research in basic science, translational research and clinical medicine that will expedite our fundamental understanding and improve treatment of Huntington’s disease and related disorders. www.iospress.com/journal/journal-of-huntingtons-disease

ABOUT IOS PRESS

Commencing its publishing activities in 1987, IOS Press (www.iospress.com) serves the information needs of scientific and medical communities worldwide. IOS Press now (co-)publishes over 100 international journals and about 130 book titles each year on subjects ranging from computer sciences and mathematics to medicine and the natural sciences.

IOS Press continues its rapid growth, embracing new technologies for the timely dissemination of information. All journals are available electronically and an e-book platform was launched in 2005.

Headquartered in Amsterdam with satellite offices in the USA, Germany, India and China, IOS Press has established several strategic co-publishing initiatives. Notable acquisitions included Delft University Press in 2005 and Millpress Science Publishers in 2008. 

Contact:
Daphne Watrin
IOS Press
Tel: +31 20 688 3355
Fax: +31 20 687 0019
Email: d.watrin@iospress.nl
www.iospress.com/journal/journal-of-huntingtons-disease