• Slider BPL Inaugural issue
  • Slider_JSA_firstissue
  • Slider Thompson2



Our (e)Books and (e)Journals

IOS Press serves the information needs of scientific and medical communities worldwide. See what's new and browse our books and journals to learn more.

  • Statement side banner
  • go-to-ejournals
  • Journal Catalogue 2015
  • Go to IOS Press Ebooks
  • Millpress and Delft University Press imprints IOS Press
  • worldofstatisticsbanner



Can Physical Exercise Enhance Long-Term Memory?

November 25, 2015 - Exercise can enhance the development of new brain cells in the adult brain, a process called adult neurogenesis. These newborn brain cells play an important role in learning and memory. A new study has determined that mice that spent time running on wheels not only developed twice the normal number of new neurons, but also showed an increased ability to distinguish new objects from familiar objects. These results are published in the first issue of Brain Plasticity, a new journal from IOS Press.

November 25, 2015

Use of benzodiazepines and related drugs common around Alzheimer’s diagnosis

October 22, 2015 - Benzodiazepines and related drugs are initiated frequently in persons with Alzheimer's disease already before the diagnosis, and their use becomes even more common after the diagnosis, shows a recent study from the University of Eastern Finland. Benzodiazepines and related drugs are used as a sleep medication and for anxiolytic purposes. These drugs were initiated more frequently in persons with Alzheimer's disease than in persons not diagnosed with AD. Compared to persons not diagnosed with AD, it was three times more likely for persons with Alzheimer's disease to initiate benzodiazepine use after the diagnosis, and benzodiazepines were most commonly initiated six months after the diagnosis.

October 22, 2015

Reproductive history and risk of cognitive impairment in elderly women: a cross-sectional study in eastern China

November 12, 2015 - Researchers led by Professor Jun-Fen Lin at Zhejiang Provincial Center for Disease Control and Prevention have found that reproductive history, an important modifier of estrogen exposure across women’s lifetime, is associated with risk of cognitive impairment in postmenopausal women. These findings are published in the Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease.

November 12, 2015

Changes in humour may be an early sign of dementia

November 12, 2015 - Researchers at University College London (UCL) have revealed that a change in sense of humour could be an early sign of dementia. The findings could help improve dementia diagnosis, by highlighting changes not commonly thought to be linked to the condition. The study was funded by Alzheimer’s Research UK, the Wellcome Trust, Medical Research Council (MRC) and NIHR Queen Square Dementia Biomedical Research Unit. The research was published in the Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease on 10 November 2015.

November 12, 2015